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Dad, What is wrong with the House of Representatives?


John Hanson The Moor -- the first black U.S. President debunked by Stanley L. Klos

Was John Hanson A Moor?


"Black Moor"  John Hanson depicted on the Back of the $2.00 Bill according to Innis

 

REBUTTAL 
By: Stanley L. Klos

The picture on the $2 Bill is Trumbull's painting of the Committee of Five presenting the Declaration of Independence to President of the Continental Congress of the United Colonies. John Hancock was the President not John Hanson in 1776.  

In fact, John Hanson was never a member of the Continental Congress. He didn't serve as a Delegate until 1781 after the Continental Congress was replaced by the United States in Congress Assembled by the Constitution of 1777. The 1776 Delegate member Innis circles as John Hanson the  Black Moor on the $2 Bill is actually George Walton of Georgia.  

There was no photography in 1783 when President Hanson died so such a photograph is a physical impossibility. The picture of the “Moor,” John Hanson, shown in this video and in the Innis article is actually a Sixth-plate daguerreotype, ca. 1856 (http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/trr033.html) of John Hanson the 19th century Liberian Senator from Grand Bassa County who championed the relocation of slaves et al to Liberia.  

Finally, President Hanson was the 3rd President of the United States in Congress Assembled, not the first. He was preceded by Samuel Huntington (1st) and Thomas McKean (2nd).  On my website, johnhanson.net, I have an image of the letter signed by Hanson as President thanking Thomas McKean for serving as President. The picture utilized on the website is John Hanson who was not a Black Moor.  For more go to uspresidency.com.

 

 

John Hanson Letter as the 3rd President of the United States in Congress Assembled congratulating Thomas McKean for his service is irrefutable proof that he was not the 1st president of the United States or the 1st President of Continental Congress as maintained by the Smithsonian Institute in their Presidential Exhibit - Courtesy of the Author


 

Email Question

On 5/2/2007 at 11:49 PM Byron Evans wrote John Hanson.net:

I agree that George Washington was not the first President of the United States, but isn't it true that John Hanson was a moor that of a dark-skinned African-American color? Per Nuwaubian Moors Newsletter (Ed. 1, Vol. 16, October 19, 1997) and the portrait of proof is backed up by the Library of Congress. (Go to lcweb2.loc.gov)

I look forward to your response.

Byron

*********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

Dear Byron,

Went to the web site to view the picture but found none, what is the link to the picture?

Also haven't seen the research cited in or the article in Nuwaubian Moors Newsletter -- Ed. 1, Vol. 16, October 19, 1997

My research indicates President Hanson wasn't Swedish -- http://www.genealogi.se/roots/hanson.htm is a good summary

I also found no evidence he was a moor

Stan Klos

*********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

On 5/4/2007 at 12:15 AM byronkevans@ wrote:

First of all, I'd like to thank you for your swift response. Second, months ago, I went to that link and they had the picture posted on there. I even saved it as a screen saver on my pc at work. It was pretty embarrassing going to it today and not seeing it after I cited it as a means of my proof. Nevertheless, I have an attachment that states the same thing that WAS on the loc.gov website. I'm going to continue to dig more and supply it to you.

Hope to hear from you again,

Byron

*********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

Dear Byron,

Thanks for sending me the research done by

Cyril Innis Jr. Deputy Director Discretionary
Department Of Youth and Program Operations -Discretionary
156 William Street 4th Fl.
New York, N.Y. 10038 (212) 676 -8243
Cinnis@dycd.nyc.gov

Evidently his research has legs as you are about the 50th person who brought this to my attention. You are, however, the first to send me the source of this myth claiming President John Hanson was a Moor. I reproduced Innis' work below:

A "Black" Man, A Moor, John Hanson
By: Cyril Innis Jr. Deputy Director Discretionary
Department Of Youth and Program Operations -Discretionary

What is on the Back of the Two Dollar Bill? The back of the $2 bill has an engraving of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. In the image is a man who has dark skin and wearing a powdered wig while sitting at the table just to the left of the men standing in the center of the engraving. This dark skinned man is John Hanson in his position as president of the continental congress. In the original painting hanging in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda, the dark skinned man does not appear!!!

A "Black" Man, A Moor, John Hanson

Was the First President of the United States! 1781-1782 A.D.??? George Washington was really the 8th President of the United States! George Washington was not the first President of the United States. In fact, the first President of the United States was one John Hanson. Don't go checking the encyclopedia for this guy's name - he is one of those great men that are lost to history. If you're extremely lucky, you may actually find a brief mention of his name. The new country was actually formed on March 1, 1781 with the adoption of The Articles of Confederation. This document was actually proposed on June 11, 1776, but not agreed upon by Congress until November 15, 1777. Maryland refused to sign this document until Virginia and New York ceded their western lands (Maryland was afraid that these states would gain too much power in the new government from such large amounts of land). Once the signing took place in 1781, a President was needed to run the country. John Hanson was chosen unanimously by Congress (which included George Washington). In fact, all the other potential candidates refused to run against him, as he was a major player in the revolution and an extremely influential member of Congress. As the first President, Hanson had quite the shoes to fill. No one had ever been President and the role was poorly defined. His actions in office would set precedent for all future Presidents. He took office just as the Revolutionary War ended. Almost immediately, the troops demanded to be paid. As would be expected after any long war, there were no funds to meet the salaries. As a result, the soldiers threatened to overthrow the new government and put Washington on the throne as a monarch. All the members of Congress ran for their lives, leaving Hanson as the only guy left running the government. He somehow managed to calm the troops down and hold the country together. If he had failed, the government would have fallen almost immediately and everyone would have been bowing to King Washington. In fact, Hanson sent 800 pounds of sterling silver by his brother Samuel Hanson to George Washington to provide the troops with shoes. Hanson, as President, ordered all foreign troops off American soil, as well as the removal of all foreign flags. This was quite the feat, considering the fact that so many European countries had a stake in the United States since the days following Columbus. Hanson established the Great Seal of the United States, which all Presidents have since been required to use on all official documents. President Hanson also established the first Treasury Department, the first Secretary of War, and the first Foreign Affairs Department. Lastly, he declared that the fourth Thursday of every November was to be Thanksgiving Day, which is still true today. The Articles of Confederation only allowed a President to serve a one year term during any three year period, so Hanson actually accomplished quite a bit in such little time. Six other presidents were elected after him - Elias Boudinot (1783), Thomas Mifflin (1784), Richard Henry Lee (1785), Nathan Gorman (1786), Arthur St. Clair (1787), and Cyrus Griffin (1788) - all prior to Washington taking office. So what happened? Why don't we ever hear about the first seven Presidents of the United States? It's quite simple - The Articles of Confederation didn't work well. The individual states had too much power and nothing could be agreed upon. A new doctrine needed to be written - something we know as the Constitution. And that leads us to the end of our story. George Washington was definitely not the first President of the United States. He was the first President of the United States under the Constitution we follow today. And the first seven Presidents are forgotten in history

END RESEARCH BY Innis


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